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Why  Goats

(especially dairy goats)

Manageable

• Goats can be kept even if the land available is small; and even by people with no land at all.   more...

• Including goats on a smallholding does not reduce the productivity of arable production and usually increases it.   more...

Time needed to care for a goat does not prevent school attendance.

• Construction of a goat house is within the means of a poor family.

50% cross-breeds are particularly easy keep, and have high potential

                                       for breed improvement.

Nutrition

• Milk provides fat and protein which are deficient in the diet of poor rural Ugandans, but most do not have access to it.  more...

• Goats milk is particularly suitable for infant feeding. more...

• Goats milk is particularly useful when HIV+ mothers wean babies early to prevent mother-to-child transmission. more...

• Many Ugandans react to cows milk but can take goats milk.  more...

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Income

• Many goat keepers are able to sell milk to neighbours, to get a steady daily or weekly income.  more...

• Kids from good blood lines command a premium if sold for breeding.

• Kids from dairy-type goats grow quickly and can be sold for meat, to raise lump-sum cash for school fees, medical bills etc.  more...

• Commercialisation is feasible if many keepers cooperate.  more...

Environment

• Where arable farming is practiced goats are not allowed to roam freely, and so do not become an environmental hazard.  more...

• Planting environmentally beneficial trees becomes more attractive when the leaves can find use as goat fodder.  more...

• The manure from the goats is a very valuable by-product which can prevent soils from becoming depleted in nutrients.  more...

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Children giving water to a kid dairy goat Milking a goat for household consumption Erosion control using goat fodder (calliandra)